Revisiting the Catharijneconvent Museum

MonstranceA little over a year ago, the Catharijneconvent Museum experienced a robbery. Only one item was stolen, but it was taken in broad daylight during opening hours. The monstrance, a large gold vessel used to hold the consecrated Eurcharistic host, is one of a handful on display at the museum. Fortunately, police were able to recover it and it was eventually put back on display.

The Catharijneconvent has a new exhibit — Thuis in de bijbel (At home with the Bible) — that I was curious to see, so while I was there the other week, I decided to quickly stop in to see the recovered monstrance (seen in the photo above). It’s an effective display room that I remember from my previous visit. It’s a small, dark, low-ceilinged room with the items on display spotlit. All the gold, silver, and similar materials really do shine in that setting. Some are old pieces, while others are relatively new, including some of the bejewelled rings on display. I’ll hold my tongue on the amount of Church wealth on display in that one room.

I gave a quick walk-through some of the other areas I’ve seen before and this time I took a photo of the carpet in one section that I get a kick out of. As you’re walking through the room, you don’t immediately notice the pattern of the carpet cut-out, but when seen from the right angle, it becomes quite clear. A bit of modern styling amid centuries-old religious artworks.Carpet Design

Catching Up with Boats and Monstrances

Thousand-year-old boat
After a day spent wrestling with Firefox (which refused to play nice with the other programs I needed), I’m going to simply attempt a quick roundup post to cover a few things of interest.

First up, you may remember the post I did about the recent theft of a monstrance (religious doodad) from the Catharijne Convent Museum. Well, it turns out that they caught the three people responsible and recovered the missing bit. The museum hopes to have it back on display soon.

In other news, they’ve found the remains of another old boat near the Catharijnesingel. (Honestly, Utrecht isn’t like Atlanta where everything is named Peachtree, or in this case Catharijne. It’s just a coincidence.) The canal, which became a highway, which is reverting back to a canal, was the site of the recent archaeological excavation. In fact, for my British readers, you may appreciate the fact that it was found near the Boots pharmacy over by the train station.

Anyway, the remains of the ship are oak and measure around 8 meters long and 2.5 meters wide. American (and some British) readers will have to do the metric to imperial conversion on their own, but trust me, it’s a good size. The boat dates to sometime between 500 to 1000 AD. It’s one of many boat remains that have been found in the general area in recent years. In fact, the really poor photo at the top is of a thousand-year-old boat that now stands in dry dock in the Utrecht Centraal Museum. You can literally smell the history when you step into that room. For what it’s worth, history smells a bit funky.