Time Travel: Pieterskerkhof and the Domtoren

domtoren seen from pieterskerkhof 1925 HUA creditThe browser tab cleanup continues …
This image (photo via Het Utrechts Archief) of Pieterskerkhof, with the Domtoren in the background, is from 1925. This is a stretch that really hasn’t changed much at all. That’s Pieterskerk (St. Peter’s Church), the brick building on the far left and the only thing that has changed slightly is the entrance, which seems to have grown a story and added a window. (It’s the bit right next to the white/grey building.)

The lamps have changed, there are a lot more bicycles, and a few trees have changed places, but otherwise, it’s instantly recognizable. Trust me, even the buildings in the background are the same.

I used to joke in the US about how certain streets were what I called “church row”, with seemingly a church on every street corner. This takes the cake, though. As I said, that’s a church there on the left and then not much further on, you can see the top of the cathedral and the Domtoren. I’m lousy at distances, but according to Google maps, it’s a walking distance of 230 meters/250 yards. They say it’s a three minute walk, but that seems awfully slow to me. Of course, if you stop to admire the local cats and the beautiful buildings, it will take a lot longer than three minutes.

Always the DomPieterskerkhof is definitely worth a visit if you’re visiting Utrecht or newly arrived. It’s a surprising cul de sac with a fascinating mix of old and new buildings and some great rooftop views. And when the sun filters through the trees, the charm level goes through the roof.
Summer Light

Blue Sky Dreaming

utrecht architectureIt’s that time of year again when the skies are grey and rain shows up in the daily forecast. In other words, the weather vacillates between meh and miserable. I really should get one of those sun lamps, but until I do, I’ll tide myself over with pictures of crisp blue skies (and pretty buildings).

Utrecht’s Beautiful Canals

Oudegracht
One last post today, as I noticed people getting to my blog via searches for the beautiful canals of Utrecht. We do have beautiful canals, the Oudegracht being one of the best known. I like how it changes depending on where along the canal you are. Some parts are busy and more commercial; one section features some of the typical tall, narrow buildings(see above); while another section is more quiet and residential. All are appealing in their own right.

The section in the first photo is filled with lots of great shops, including a nice yarn shop, and a shop called It’s a Present, which has lots of fun little decorative items, toys, and tchotchkes. The buildings along this section are the tall, narrow buildings many people think of when they think of Dutch canal buildings. One of the most charming views is of the old Magazin de Vlijt.
Magazin de VlijtThe southern end of the canal, along Twijnstraat, is the quieter spot and there are some areas along the wharves that have been built up recently, to protect against erosion perhaps? Regardless, they look lovely with all the greenery. This first photo was taken in the middle of December, with some beautiful winter sunlight.
Oudegracht
These next two photos are of roughly the same spot, but taken from the opposite side of the canal, and a month earlier. The peace and tranquillity, not to mention the lovely views, make this one of my favorite spots in the city. Who wouldn’t want to sit out there with a cup of coffee or a glass of wine and enjoy the scenery.
Oudegracht
Oudegracht

Rotterdam’s Cube Houses

Cube Houses
As mentioned previously, while some friends were visiting last month, we took a trip to Rotterdam. There was only one main goal that day — a post still to come — but while we were there, I really wanted to see the Cube Houses.

The Cube Houses (kubuswoning) were built between 1982 and 1984, although the plans were first presented in 1978. The architect was Piet Blom. The first cube homes were actually built in Helmond, in 1974/75, as a test, and by 1977, a total of 18 were built in Helmond, although there were plans to built many more.

In Rotterdam, 38 cubes were built, along with two “super cubes”. All of the cubes are attached together. Per the Wikipedia description: “Blom tilted the cube of a conventional house 45 degrees, and rested it upon a hexagon-shaped pylon. His design represents a village within a city, where each house represents a tree, and all the houses together, a forest.”
Cube Houses
The cubes are used as residences, while the space in the pylons below is used for commercial purposes. The cubes themselves are divided into three levels, with the first floor serving as an open-plan living room and kitchen, the second floor has two bedrooms and a bathroom, and the top floor is sometimes used as a small garden. The walls and windows are angled at 54.7 degrees.

So many people have been curious to see the inside of the cube homes, that one owner converted one of the cubes into a show cube, to give people a feel for how the space is used residentially. Unfortunately, I didn’t have a chance to see it for myself. Next time!
Cube Houses
Cube Houses
Cube HousesCube HousesCube HousesCube HousesCube Houses
Cube Houses